Thursday, February 19, 2009

Gallery 1C03 at The University of Winnipeg proudly presents Everett Soop: Journalist, Cartoonist Activist


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Gallery 1C03 at The University of Winnipeg
proudly presents

Everett Soop: Journalist, Cartoonist, Activist


WINNIPEG MB, February 23, 2009Gallery 1C03 to host touring exhibition curated by Heather Devine and Geraldine Chimirri-Russell, organized by the Nickle Arts Museum at the University of Calgary, showcasing selected political cartoons created by Soop in the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s.

Everett Soop (1943 – 2004), from the Blood (Kainai) Reserve in Alberta, was one of Canada’s first Aboriginal journalists and editorial cartoonists. A preeminent wit and social critic, Soop’s skilled and creative pen was well poised to deliver cutting political commentary. Soop remains highly respected and admired for his insightful remarks on a range of issues that spared no sentiments; all interest groups were satirized in fair share for the positions and roles they played in the structuring and realization of life in Canada.


After attending St. Paul’s Indian Residential School to the fifth grade, Soop completed his schooling in Cardston, Alberta. He was a gifted artist and writer, and attended various schools including the Alberta College of Art, Brigham Young University in Utah, the University of Lethbridge, and later Mount Royal College. In 1968, he joined the Kainai News as an editorial journalist and columnist.

At the age of 16, Soop was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy. As his illness progressed, he became confined in a wheelchair. Rather than give in to the disease, he became involved in advocacy work by educating health professionals and citizens at large about issues concerning the physically disabled.

Everett Soop was an early leader in the Aboriginal political movement that surfaced in the 1960s, and his is the only Aboriginal artist whose work is represented in the Museum of Caricatures of the National Archives of Canada. This exhibition serves to celebrate life and work through a retrospective presentation of his political cartoons.

Everett Soop: Journalist, Cartoonist, Activist is available for viewing from March 5 - April 4, 2009.

Members of the media are invited to arrange interviews with co-curator, Dr. Heather Devine, on March 5 and 6, 2009.

RELATED EVENTS
  • Exhibition launch – Thursday, March 5, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. (1st Floor, Centennial Hall)
  • Lecture by Dr. Heather Devine, “Everett Soop’s Cartoons: Their Political and Social Context” – Friday, March 6 at 12:30 p.m. in Room 2C15 (2nd Floor, Centennial Hall)
  • Panel discussion: “Humor in Indigenous Cultures” featuring Carol Shields Writer in Residence, Maria Campbell; comedian Ryan McMahon; and Indigenous Literatures scholar, Niigonwedom J. Sinclair – Thursday, March 19 at 6:30 p.m. in Convocation Hall (more info coming soon!)

Admission is always free and all are welcome!


Gallery hours from March 5 – April 4, 2009: Monday – Friday: 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.; Saturday: 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Gallery 1C03 thanks the Department of Canadian Heritage for its generous financial support through the Exhibition Circulation Fund.

Image: Everett Soop, photographed by his brother, Louis, at Standoff, Alberta, in the 1970s. Courtesy of Louis Soop.


Milena Placentile, Art Curator, Gallery 1C03, University of Winnipeg
515 Portage Ave, Winnipeg MB R3B 2E9
204.786.9253 | m.placentile@uwinnipeg.ca
uwinnipeg.ca/index/artgallery-index | gallery1C03.blogspot.com

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dear Milena Placentile,

In looking up some information on the University of Winnipeg web site, I happened to discover that you currently are showing an exhibition of cartooning by Everett Soop.

However, I was surprised at the omission in mentioning a 52-minute documentary film titled Soop on Wheels on Everett's life story and contributions.

It has been purchased by many universities in Canada and the United States. Perhaps the University of Winnipeg library system already has it. If not, the Canadian educational distributor is
www.mcnabbconnolly.ca

Everett's life's work, both as a cartoonist and also as an advocate for Aboriginal people with disabilities, continues to be under-recognized.

I knew Everett for 14 delightful years, in which he truly was a mentor. I also happen to be the director/writer/producer of Soop on Wheels, which was shown on six Canadian broadcasters, and sold abroad, including Maori TV in New Zealand. Also, the film was invited to nine international film festivals, including Sundance 2000.

Two years prior to Everett's passing, the Native American Journalists Association gave him a Lifetime Achievement Award, after one of its board members saw my film, and recognized the lack of previous recognition.

Indeed, I created the film story to honour Everett, and keep alive his legacy. Your exhibition is a wonderful acknowledgment of Everett Soop.

Warm regards, Sandy Greer, Ph.D Writer/Filmmaker/Educator

Anonymous said...

Hello Sandy,

Thank you for your message and for bringing this documentary to my attention.

Gallery 1C03 is hosting this exhibition as a loan from the Nickle Art Museum at the University of Calgary. Due to the very small size of our gallery, we are displaying what amount to less than 1/4 of the exhibition as it was actually presented at other venues. The selection of work and archival material on display was selected by one of the co-curators of the exhibition, Geraldine Chimirri-Russell. One video was made available to us, and that is documentation of Louis Soop receiving the Meritorious Service Award on Everett's behalf. It is a shame we didn't receive a copy of Soop on Wheels to screen, but perhaps it was included in the full-version of the exhibition?

I regret that we wouldn't be able to organize a screening at this late date — the exhibition closes on April 4, but if you don't mind, I would like to re-post your message to our blog (http://gallery1c03.blogspot.com/2009/02/gallery-1c03-at-university-of-winnipeg.html), which would give people reading about the exhibition an opportunity to read about the documentary, as well.

Thank you again for mentioning your production; I hope I'll have a chance to view it one day soon. And, thank you for your kind words about the exhibition — we are very lucky that Geraldine and Dr. Heather Devine spent so many years working on it, and that it has now
been made available to us.

All the very best,
Milena